I finally did the logical thing…

…and talked to the Hillel rabbi.

Guess who’s going to Shabbat services AND dinner (and lunch tomorrow)?  This girl!!!!!!!!


Hanukkah Sweaters

When these come out, I WANT ONE!!!!

http://www.geltfiend.com/


It’s a little early to be posting a Sukkot music video, but this is awesome.


So, here I am, in college…

I’ve been here for a week and a half now.  Classes started yesterday.  

I have the absolute freedom I’ve been awaiting for so long…and I have no idea where to start.  Little things, I suppose:

I went to the kosher food section in the dining hall for the second time tonight.  The woman there seems really nice.  She asked me how my day was and how my classes were going.  I’m not going to eat kosher food there all the time (yet) mainly because I don’t want to go too quickly with the transition.  And keeping kosher (or as close as I can get) at home will be a completely different situation.

Last Saturday was the first Shabbat for which I was on campus.  I didn’t go to services, because (a) I don’t have anyone (yet) with whom to go (and help me follow along) and (b) it would just be weird — as a non-Jew — to go to Shabbat services for the very first Shabbat that I’m on campus.  I don’t want people thinking I’m too eager. (maybe that’s not qute the right word?)

Also, on Sunday I auditioned for my college’s Jewish a cappella group.  I haven’t done anything musical since I was in middle school choir, and my music skills are very lacking, but it was still fun to audition.  Of course, I didn’t make it, but the consolation prize was that a lot of people auditioned.

So…right now I’m trying to figure out how to get into a routine of Jewish things and get involved with Hillel.  One of the people I met online suggested going to Reform High Holiday services at my college (tickets aren’t required) since Reform services are usually easier to follow and I haven’t even learned all of the traditional/Hebrewservices for a normal Shabbat (much less the High  Holidays).  So I’m considering Reform High Holiday services, but I would want to go to Shabbat services at least once before the High Holidays (As a non-Jew, I don’t want to be meeting everyone at Hillel for the first time at Rosh Hashanah services. That would probably strike people as strange.)  So I’m going to have to suppress my awkward fearful sheepishness either this weekend or next.


No, I haven’t dropped off the face of the earth.

I’m still here.  Just busy with moving into college and the beginning of the semester.


If anyone can think of Hebrew names that are “unisex,” please send ‘em my way!

ludmirermoyd:

I mean it doesn’t hurt to start thinking about a Hebrew name now, though it’s not my top priority.

I know this is an old post from many months ago, but I just found it.  I remember reading Andrea Myers’s book The Choosing, and when she converted, she chose the Hebrew name “Yonah” (meaning “dove”).  In her case, she liked that the name was unisex because it meant that her children could have both her and her female partner’s name in their Hebrew names (since the parents’ names are included in Hebrew names) without having to face censure in more conservative circles.  

Also, a great resource is Kveller’s Jewish Baby Name Finder.  You can search through there — names in green are unisex.

Best of luck with the Jewish learning and conversion process!


Two days until I move!

College, here I come!



Q
Hi, I came across your blog and I find it so relatable and interesting. My grandmother on my dad's side is Jewish, but my parents are both atheists. I got interested in Judaism in grade 6, and am currently trying to convert. :) (because I don't technically count). I think your blog is amazing, so keep it up! <3
A

Thank you!!!  That’s cool that you have a Jewish grandparent.  I have no Jewish ancestry of which I’m aware. 


haaretz:

For the first time, a rabbi in Germany has been sued for carrying out a circumcision.
Rabbi David Goldberg, the chief rabbi of Hof in Bavaria, was reportedly sued on Tuesday by a German doctor for inflicting “physical harm” on a boy by circumcising him.
The case comes after a court in Cologne ruled in May that circumcisions cause physical harm and are therefore illegal. Read more.

Seriously?

haaretz:

For the first time, a rabbi in Germany has been sued for carrying out a circumcision.

Rabbi David Goldberg, the chief rabbi of Hof in Bavaria, was reportedly sued on Tuesday by a German doctor for inflicting “physical harm” on a boy by circumcising him.

The case comes after a court in Cologne ruled in May that circumcisions cause physical harm and are therefore illegal. Read more.

Seriously?